An Advisers Life – Real Current Examples Of What Advisers Are Not Allowed To Do


Far to often we receive emails from TJHN readers asking questions about advisers, and in certain circumstances it leads to our cleaning up the mess that other people have made.

Family Advisers are important people in your hockey life.  Make no mistake about it, a good one is worth his weight in gold.  A real good one can create opportunity for you that you had only imagined in the past.

A bad one though can be the headache you would not wish upon your worst enemy.

So, here are some examples of what an Adviser CAN NOT do;

Advisers can not approve or agree to a trade on his players behalf.

Advisers do not tell players where they should play.

Advisers work for the family.  This means the Adviser is not allowed to tell you to do anything, he is your employee, not your boss.

Advisers do not accept anyone as a client who can or will pay the fee.

Advisers CAN NOT accept monthly payments or payment over time.

Advisers can not force you to agree to a trade he has arranged for you without your consent.

Advisers do not make threats to their clients, or coaches.

Advisers do not ask clients to sign or keep confidentiality agreements concerning their adviser service agreement.

The reason I have taken the time to write about these items is that too many people think they are hiring an adviser when they are really hiring a fake adviser.

Just because someone calls themselves an adviser does not mean they have the requisite experience to actually do the job.

Experience in actually getting players to NCAA hockey is the only thing you are looking for.  Anything other than that and you really have nothing further to discuss.

The unfortunate truth about Advisers is that, if you cant afford a good Adviser, you are better off not having one.

If you have questions or comments on how these items may relate to you, feel free to email me directly.

Joseph Kolodziej – Adviser